What Are the 48 Laws of Power? The Complete List

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What are the 48 Laws of Power? How can I use them to succeed?

The 48 Laws of Power come from Robert Greene’s book The 48 Laws of Power, in which Greene culls lessons from the lives of powerful historical figures to distill a set of laws that you can follow to become powerful in your own life.

Keep reading for the complete list of the 48 Laws of Power, with explanations.

Overview: What Are the 48 Laws of Power?

Greene asserts that whether you like it or not, you’re part of a never-ending game of power. You’re either striving for and wielding power, or you’re a pawn being played by someone more powerful than you. You choose your role. 

So what are the 48 Laws of Power, and how do you use them? These laws are for those who prefer to be players rather than pawns. To turn you from an amateur into a master player, Greene has codified the 48 laws of power based on historical examples of people who’ve excelled or failed at wielding power, with glorious or bloody results (or both). Some key principles you’ll learn: Use your enemies, keep others dependent on you, say as little as possible, take credit for others’ work, control all the options, don’t take sides, create a cult following, and don’t get your hands dirty.

You can choose to apply or dismiss these rules – but you can’t escape them.

The 48 Laws of Power

What are the 48 Laws of Power? Here are all 48 laws, with explanations:


Law 1: Never Outshine the Master: Ensure that those above you always feel superior. Go out of your way to make your bosses look better and feel smarter than anyone else. Everyone is insecure, but an insecure boss can retaliate more strongly than others can.

Law 2: Never Put too Much Trust in Friends, Learn How to Use Enemies: Keep a close eye on your friends — they get envious and will undermine you. If you co-opt an enemy, he’ll be more loyal than a friend because he’ll try harder to prove himself worthy of your trust.

Law 3: Conceal Your Intentions: Always hide your true intentions. Create a smokescreen. If you keep people off-balance and in the dark, they can’t counter your efforts.

Law 4: Always Say Less than Necessary: Say little and be ambiguous, leaving the meaning to others to interpret. The less you say, the more intimidating and powerful you are.

Law 5: So Much Depends on Reputation — Guard It with Your Life: Nurture and guard your reputation because reputation is integral to power. With a strong reputation, you can influence and intimidate others.

Law 6: Create an Air of Mystery: Be outrageous or create an aura of mystery. Any attention — positive or negative — is better than being ignored. Attention brings you wealth.

Law 7: Get Others to Do the Work for You, but Always Take the Credit: Get others to do your work for you. Use their skill, time, and energy to further your ambitions while taking full credit. You’ll be admired for your efficiency.

Law 8: Make Other People Come to You — Use Bait if Necessary: Make your opponent come to you. When you force others to act, you’re in control. Bait them, then attack.

Law 9: Win Through Your Actions, Never Through Argument: Demonstrate your point rather than arguing. Arguing rarely changes anyone’s mind, but people believe what they see. They’re also less likely to be offended.

Law 10: Infection: Avoid the Unhappy and Unlucky: Avoid miserable people. The perpetually miserable spread misery like an infection, and they’ll drown you in it.

Law 11: Learn to Keep People Dependent on You: Make your superior dependent on you. The more she needs you, the more security and freedom you have to pursue your goals.

Law 12: Use Selective Honesty and Generosity to Disarm Your Victim: Use honesty and generosity to disarm and distract others from your schemes. Even the most suspicious people respond to acts of kindness, leaving them vulnerable to manipulation.

Law 13: When Asking for Help, Appeal to People’s Self-Interest, Never to their Mercy or Gratitude: When you need help from someone in a position of power, appeal to their self-interest. They’ll be glad to help if they’ll get something in return, and you’ll get what you want without seeming desperate or irritating.

Law 14: Pose as a Friend, Work as a Spy: Be friendly, sympathetic, and interested to get people to reveal their deepest thoughts and feelings. When you know your opponent’s secrets, you can predict his behavior and control him.

Law 15: Crush Your Enemy Totally: Crush your enemy completely. If you leave even one ember smoldering, it will eventually ignite. You can’t afford to be lenient.

Law 16: Use Absence to Increase Respect and Honor: Once you’ve become well-known, don’t wear out your welcome. The more you’re seen and heard from, the more you cheapen your brand. 

Law 17: Keep Others in Suspended Terror: Cultivate an Air of Unpredictability: Throw others off balance and unnerve them with random, unpredictable acts. You’ll gain the upper hand.

Law 18: Do Not Build Fortresses to Protect Yourself – Isolation is Dangerous: Never isolate yourself when under pressure. This cuts you off from information you need, and when real danger arises you won’t see it coming. 

Law: 19: Know Who You’re Dealing With – Do Not Offend the Wrong Person: When attempting to deceive someone, know who you’re dealing with, so you don’t waste your time or stir up a hornets’ nest in reaction.

Law 20: Do Not Commit to Anyone: Don’t commit to any side or cause except yourself. By maintaining your independence, you remain in control — others will vie for your attention. You also have the ability to pit the sides against each other.

Law 21: Play a Sucker to Catch a Sucker – Seem Dumber Than Your Mark: Make your intended victims feel as though they’re smarter than you are, and they won’t suspect you of having ulterior motives.

Law 22: Use the Surrender Tactic: Transform Weakness into Power: When you’re weaker, surrender rather than fighting for the sake of honor. This gives you time to build strength and undermine your victor. You’ll win in the end.

Law 23: Concentrate Your Forces: Focus your resources and energies where you’ll have the most impact or get the most benefit. Otherwise, you’ll waste limited time and energy.

Law 24: Play the Perfect Courtier: Learn the rules of the society you’re playing in, and follow them to avoid attracting unfavorable attention. This includes appearing like a team player and being careful about criticizing diplomatically.

Law 25: Re-Create Yourself: Create a powerful image that stands out, rather than letting others define you. Change your appearance and emotions to suit the occasion. People who seem larger than life attract admiration and power.

Law: 26: Keep Your Hands Clean: You’ll inevitably make mistakes or need to take care of unpleasant problems. But keep your hands clean by finding others to do the dirty work, and scapegoats to blame.

Law 27: Play on People’s Need to Believe to Create a Cultlike Following: Offer people something to believe in and someone to follow. Promise the world but keep it vague; whip up enthusiasm. People will respond to a desperate need for belonging. Followers line your pockets, and your opponents are afraid to rile them.

Law 28: Enter Action with Boldness: When you act, do so boldly — and if you make mistakes, correct them with even greater boldness. Boldness brings admiration and power.

Law 29: Plan All the Way to the End: Make detailed plans with a clear ending. Take into account all possible developments. Then don’t be tempted from your path. Otherwise, you risk being surprised and forced to react without time to think.

Law 30: Make Your Accomplishments Seem Effortless: Make difficult feats seem effortless and you’ll inspire awe in others and seem powerful. By contrast, when you make too much of your efforts, your achievement will seem less impressive and you’ll lose respect.

Law 31: Control the Options: Get Others to Play with the Cards You Deal: To deceive people, seem to give them a meaningful choice. But sharply limit their options to a few that work in your favor regardless of which they choose. Your victims will feel in control, but you’ll pull the strings. 

Law 32: Play to People’s Fantasies: Conjure up alluring fantasies in contrast to the gloomy realities of life, and people will flock to you. Spin the right tale and wealth and power will follow.

Law 33: Discover Each Man’s Thumbscrew: Everyone has a weakness, a hole in his armor. Find it and it’s leverage that you can use to your advantage. 

Law 34: Be Royal in Your Own Fashion: Act Like a King to Be Treated Like One: Act like royalty and people will treat you that way. Project dignity and supreme confidence that you’re destined for great things, and others will believe it.

Law 35: Master the Art of Timing: Anticipate the ebb and flow of power. Recognize when the time is right, and align yourself with the right side. Be patient and wait for your moment. Bad timing ends careers and ambitions.

Law 36: Disdain Things You Cannot Have: Ignoring Them Is the Best Revenge: Sometimes it’s better to ignore things because reacting can make small problems worse, make you look bad, and give your enemy attention.

Law 37: Create Compelling Spectacles: In addition to words, use visuals and symbols to underscore your power. What people see makes a greater impression on them than what they hear. 

Law 38: Think as You Like But Behave Like Others: Don’t make a show of being different, or people will think you look down on them and will retaliate against you.

Law 39: Stir Up Waters to Catch Fish: Always stay calm and objective. When you get angry, you’ve lost control. But if you can make your enemies angry, you gain an advantage. 

Law 40: Despise the Free Lunch: Use money and generosity strategically to achieve your goals. Use gifts to build a reputation of generosity, and also to obligate people to you.

Law 41: Avoid Stepping Into a Great Man’s Shoes: If you succeed a great leader or famous parent, find or create your own space to fill. Sharply separate from the past and set your own standards — or you’ll be deemed a failure for not being a clone of your predecessor.

Law 42: Strike the Shepherd and the Sheep Will Scatter: Trouble in a group often starts with a single individual who stirs the pot. Stop them before others succumb to their influence.

Law 43: Work on the Hearts and Minds of Others: Win others’ hearts and minds. Play on their emotions and weaknesses, and appeal to their self-interest. You’ll have them eating out of your hand, and they’ll be less likely to turn on you.

Law 44: Disarm and Infuriate with the Mirror Effect: Seduce people by mirroring their emotions and interests; create the illusion that you share their values. They’ll be so grateful to be understood that they won’t notice your ulterior motives. 

Law 45: Preach the Need for Change, But Never Reform Too Much at Once: Talk change but move slowly. Evoke revered history and cloak your changes in familiar rituals. Too much change is unsettling and will spark backlash.

Law 46: Never Appear Too Perfect: To forestall or mitigate envy, admit to a flaw or weakness, emphasize the role of luck, or downplay your talents. If you don’t recognize and nip envy in the bud, it will grow and the envious will work insidiously against you. 

Law 47: Do Not Go Past the Mark You Aimed For; In Victory, Learn When to Stop: When you’ve won, don’t let emotions push you past your goal. The moment of victory is dangerous because if you press your luck, you’ll blunder into something you haven’t planned for. 

Law 48: Assume Formlessness: Be flexible, fluid, and unpredictable — formless — so your opponents can’t get a fix on you and can’t figure out how to respond.

What Are the 48 Laws of Power? The Complete List

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  • Why you should never outshine your boss
  • How to appear like a friend but behave like a spy
  • The 6 rules you absolutely must not violate, if you want to be successful

Amanda Penn

Amanda Penn is a writer and reading specialist. She’s published dozens of articles and book reviews spanning a wide range of topics, including health, relationships, psychology, science, and much more. Amanda was a Fulbright Scholar and has taught in schools in the US and South Africa. Amanda received her Master's Degree in Education from the University of Pennsylvania.

19 thoughts on “What Are the 48 Laws of Power? The Complete List

  • December 26, 2020 at 5:40 pm
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    Thanks for posting Amanda!

    Reply
  • November 30, 2021 at 8:55 am
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    Robert Greene has written this book with some knowledge of things that he can share. It looks, he lacks some experience and expertise as well as to say so in the book to go public at large.

    There are a few points that can be taken generally. There are some useful to diplomats, politicians, and other professionals. but there are some suggestions within these points and the rest of the points are vicious and can damage society. That is why, this book seems to have been banned for sale and circulation.

    What Robert can do is, he can trim the book by retaining the points that are in order in consultation with learned people on the respective subject and republish with the title “The __ Laws of Power” indicating in the blank space how many laws he can state.

    Robert has to reckon that certain things cannot be openly talked about and that too in a book. There are certain things comes to be smelt out of experience and expertise only.

    Reply
  • December 20, 2021 at 10:57 am
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    This does book does nothing more than promote toxic behavior, and its concepts are dangerous. Control, manipulation, gas lighting, mind games etc. Everything a cluster B personality types use to abuse other people. Wow! This is toxicity at it’s finest and people actually aspire to be this way. WOW!!!!

    Reply
    • March 5, 2022 at 6:21 pm
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      Great comment. Book could be titled “How to accelerate and perfect your Narcissistic Asshole Pointless and Wasted Life Experience”.
      I think I worked for a number of disciples of this books lessons, and they all never escaped their lives of self imposed misery. Often, it appeared that they were never given something they needed from their parents when young, effectively perpetuating the toxicity.
      Hey, am I power tripping on my assessment of this? Hmmm?

      Reply
    • April 6, 2022 at 12:22 pm
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      If you have been around people and seen how they interact with Each other You would know that this book primarily explains human nature. Yes we are toxic creatures. With the insight of this book you can see how different people achieve their own individual power. Most of the people that I am around at work practice these laws and have never heard of this book much less read it. Read and study this book you will become aware of the actions of those around you. Knowledge is power. Just because you know evil does not mean you have to do evil. If you have ever read The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli you will realize how leaders of countries rule their people. Its not pretty, but it’s reality

      Reply
      • October 12, 2022 at 4:01 am
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        I agree with this comment, yet also understand the premise of the comment preceding. To the untrained or unaware, these concepts of sociological Behavior, may seem harsh to adhere to. But I counter, that they do in fact appear to be useful in the context with which they were meant to be used. I feel that it is the way in which you would applicate these laws, and to what aspirations or end results you are looking for, as the basis for my analysis of whether this makes them right or wrong. But that’s a discussion for another time

        Reply
    • October 6, 2022 at 3:05 pm
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      good point try the 42 laws of maat

      Reply
  • March 3, 2022 at 7:22 pm
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    Holy shit. This is a manual for psychopaths.

    Reply
    • April 30, 2022 at 3:02 pm
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      Not all, but many are classic traits of a narcissist/psychopath. Sadly, it’s also the traits of people in the corporate world. It pays to know the type of people you are dealing with. ALL ceo’s and politicians are narcissists, sociopaths or psychopaths. People with a conscience are weeded out and discarded ,sooner or later.

      Reply
  • March 14, 2022 at 12:47 am
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    Sounds like the diary of a narcissist no thanks

    Reply
  • March 31, 2022 at 4:57 am
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    The book is an inspiration to me,Robert is right when he says there is always constant power struggle.For me I take this book as a guide and already his lessons are bearing fruits towards my vision.
    Robert is God sent🙏

    Reply
  • April 4, 2022 at 1:21 am
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    Hi All, I think the writer of this book is just trying to tell us the different types of Human Classes and how to go about issues . Our personality, thoughts and how to handle issues
    When expected. We as Human beings can not jump most of the points he made . Leadership and followership is what he is preaching here.
    Both have a rule to play.

    Reply
  • April 7, 2022 at 1:17 pm
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    The 48 laws of power leave aside religious beliefs .

    Reply
  • June 30, 2022 at 9:14 pm
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    Loved the book, very informative and interesting read. Here’s my conclusion….. if your not in the corporate world, such as Wall Street 😂😂 this book should be burned. This is just a guide to be the best narcissist you can be in a world that’s already going to hell and the wording proves that . Should have been a book to warn the few good people in the world how someone useless in the world thinks they are in the game of thrones for no reason.

    Reply
    • September 24, 2022 at 9:35 pm
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      Omg! So I’m not Insane. By time I got to Law 3, I knew this was the guide my ex husband started to live by!

      Reply
  • August 15, 2022 at 3:36 pm
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    Forgot one: promptly accuse your opponent of anti-semitism

    Reply
  • September 9, 2022 at 11:05 am
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    “People do not expect to find chastity in a whorehouse. Why, then, do they expect to find honesty and humanity in government, a congeries of institutions whose modus operandi consists of lying, cheating, stealing, and if need be, murdering those who resist?” — H. L. Mencken

    Reply
  • October 25, 2022 at 1:35 pm
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    The book makes no bones about what it is. The first word on the back cover begins with “Ruthless, cunning and amoral” what more do you need to know? I found it very interesting from an historical point of view, & it armed me against many of the sick, narcissistic people that surrounded me. Once I learned the rules of the game, I was immune to their futility.

    Reply
  • November 2, 2022 at 1:40 pm
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    The shallow thinking of these comments.

    Just because you don’t exercise these behaviors. Doesn’t mean you don’t need to be able to identify them in others. When you get divorced, dumped, When you get fired or passed up on a promotion. When your children rebel and act out of character. If you have a basic understanding of these mindsets than nothing should ever come as a surprise to you. Simple emotional intelligence will tell you if you go around manipulating people it will end up badly for you, but that’s not going to stop you from being fooled by others.

    Reply

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