How to Build a Network: Be a Giver

How to Build a Network: Be a Giver

Do you want to level up your networking game? What is the key to building strong, personal ties? According to Adam Grant, the author of Give and Take, the key to building a social network is to be a giver. Grant explains that takers and matchers usually have small networks because recipients either feel like they’re being manipulated, or the give-take relationship is a quid pro quo. Givers, on the other hand, grow large networks because they give to many people, not knowing who might be helpful down the road. Keep reading for tips on how to build a network,

Living an Authentic Life: 5 Rules for Truth-Telling

Living an Authentic Life: 5 Rules for Truth-Telling

What does an authentic life look like? How is it achieved? In The Road Less Traveled, psychiatrist M. Scott Peck argues that habitual lying in avoidance of reality ultimately leads to mental illness. On the other hand, an authentic life leads to growth, healthy relationships, and real freedom. He offers five rules for balanced truth-telling that help you navigate this tricky area of life. Keep reading to learn about living an authentic life.

Are Self-Serving Attributions Holding You Back?

Are Self-Serving Attributions Holding You Back?

What are self-serving attributions? How do they keep us from learning and growing? Self-serving attributions are a form of bias that we’re all guilty of at times. If our decision turns out well, we attribute it to our skill. If it doesn’t, we call it bad luck. When we think this way, we fail to learn from experience because we’ve mischaracterized the experience. To learn and grow, we should look honestly at ourselves—and at others. Continue reading to learn how self-serving attributions might be getting in the way of growth.

The Ability to Adapt and the Power of Letting Go

The Ability to Adapt and the Power of Letting Go

How is the ability to adapt important for personal growth and mental health? How does this ability relate to the power of letting go? Healthy navigation of life requires an ability to adapt. In The Road Less Traveled, psychiatrist M. Scott Peck calls this balance, which is a component of discipline. It allows us to remain flexible, moderating our behaviors when beneficial. It also requires sacrifices, and we would do well to embrace the power of letting go in order to grow. Keep reading to learn how the ability to adapt is an important part of mental well-being.

Love Is Not a Feeling—It Is an Act of Will

Love Is Not a Feeling—It Is an Act of Will

If love is not a feeling, what is it? Is “falling in love” genuine? In The Road Less Traveled, psychiatrist M. Scott Peck argues that love is not a feeling. We have feelings that we associate with love, but they are not love itself, and they might not even be based in reality. Peck asserts that real love is an act of will—a committed action that we take even when we’re not “feeling it.” Keep reading to learn how love is not a feeling.

The Myth of Self-Sacrificing Love: What’s the Truth?

The Myth of Self-Sacrificing Love: What’s the Truth?

Is self-sacrificing love genuine? Where can it lead? In The Road Less Traveled, psychiatrist M. Scott Peck asserts that self-sacrificing love is a myth. It’s not genuine love. If you believe it is, you are likely to end up with two destructive results: social sadomasochism and destructive nurturing. Read more to learn about this view of self-sacrificing love.

Embrace Separateness: Put Individual Growth First

Embrace Separateness: Put Individual Growth First

In what way is separateness a healthy aspect of relationships? Is growth as a couple more important than growth as individuals? In The Road Less Traveled, psychiatrist M. Scott Peck argues that couples should embrace separateness. It’s a myth that love prioritizes growth as a couple. In reality, love puts growth as individuals first. Only then does true growth occur. Continue reading to learn about the value of separateness.

How Meaningful Relationships Help Combat Depression

How Meaningful Relationships Help Combat Depression

How do meaningful relationships help prevent loneliness and depression? Why does the collective lifestyle of Amish communities help members avoid loneliness and depression? Meaningful relationships restore us to our natural states as social animals living in close-knit societies. This prevents loneliness and provides a support group that can help you heal from depression. Amish communities share everything and everyone is regarded as family. This style of collective living creates a connected community and drastically reduces the risk of depression. Read on to learn more about how meaningful relationships help prevent depression.