Mistakes Were Made: Book Overview & Takeaways

Mistakes Were Made: Book Overview & Takeaways

What is the book Mistakes Were Made about? What are the main takeaways of the book? In Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me), Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson argue that we self-justify to relieve cognitive dissonance. This is the discomfort triggered when we do things that don’t align with other beliefs, actions, and values. Read below for a brief overview of the Mistakes Were Made book.

How Myths Are Created & Used: Roland Barthes on Mythmaking

How Myths Are Created & Used: Roland Barthes on Mythmaking

Is there a myth behind children’s toys? What symbolic meaning does the Jeep brand carry? According to Roland Barthes, myths occur when society’s dominant institutions imbue an image, object, or phrase with meaning. Because myths are used to shape society, he believes it’s important to understand how myths are created and how they function. Keep reading for Barthes’s ideas on mythmaking.

3 Ways to Reduce Cognitive Dissonance (+ Why It Happens)

3 Ways to Reduce Cognitive Dissonance (+ Why It Happens)

What is cognitive dissonance? What are the most common ways to reduce cognitive dissonance? In Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me), Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson explain that cognitive dissonance is a psychological state of having inconsistent thoughts and attitudes. This state is often uncomfortable for people, so they try to seek out ways to reduce cognitive dissonance. Let’s look at how people seek comforting thoughts through three psychological processes.

Elements of Myth: Roland Barthes on Form and Concept

Elements of Myth: Roland Barthes on Form and Concept

What makes myths powerful? What’s the relationship between myth and meaning? Roland Barthes says that the images, objects, and stories we’re confronted with throughout the day are myths that contain subtle messages that subconsciously shape the way we view the world. He discusses the two basic elements of myth: form and concept. Read more to understand these basics of myth that inform how it’s used to shape society.

Self-Observation: 2 Reasons to Monitor Your Thoughts & Feelings

Self-Observation: 2 Reasons to Monitor Your Thoughts & Feelings

Do you want a better understanding of why things are the way they are? How can you intentionally ignore unwanted circumstances? Vadim Zeland claims that self-observation has two major benefits. First, it helps you understand why you’re experiencing your version of reality instead of the version of reality that you want. Second, it breaks the feedback loop that perpetuates your current version of reality. Read more to learn how observing your thoughts and emotions helps you weaken unwanted circumstances and reclaim your emotional energy.

Roland Barthes: Myth’s Creation, Function, & Dangers

Roland Barthes: Myth’s Creation, Function, & Dangers

What’s a myth? How is a myth made and used? Are myths dangerous? According to 20th-century French philosopher Roland Barthes, myth is all around us. In Mythologies, he discusses the process of mythmaking. He identifies the basic components of myth and explains what function they have in society. He also warns that myths can pose certain dangers. Continue reading to understand Barthes’s take on myth.

What Is Mel Robbins’s 5 Second Rule & Why Is It Important?

What Is Mel Robbins’s 5 Second Rule & Why Is It Important?

What is Mel Robbins’s 5 Second Rule? How can you use the Rule to take control of your life? In The 5 Second Rule, Mel Robbins explains how you can assert agency over your life by just counting down from five to one over the course of five seconds and acting when you reach one. This method is helpful for those who overthink and hesitate on tasks. Keep reading to learn more about Mel Robbins’s 5 Second Rule and how it can help you.

Self-Justification Examples: How We Excuse Our Wrongs

Self-Justification Examples: How We Excuse Our Wrongs

What are some examples of self-justification? Why do we want to protect ourselves from cognitive dissonance? Rather than admitting wrongdoing or accepting contradictory beliefs, most people find ways to justify their actions to themselves and others. According to Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson in their book Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me), this process is called self-justification. Keep reading to look at self-justification examples to better understand the psychology behind it.

How to Recognize Propaganda: 3 Tell-Tale Features

How to Recognize Propaganda: 3 Tell-Tale Features

How pervasive is propaganda? How can you tell when a message is manipulative? Propaganda is all around us. It might be a song, an image, an advertisement, or a headline. In Mythologies, Roland Barthes explains how myth is basically propaganda. He warns against its influence, so it’s important to know it when you see it. Keep reading to learn how to recognize propaganda and keep from being deceived and used.