Change Is Part of Life—So How Do You Deal with It? 7 Steps

Change Is Part of Life—So How Do You Deal with It? 7 Steps

Change is part of life. It can be distressing or rewarding, depending on our approach. “Who Moved My Cheese” is a parable that demonstrates in practical terms how to handle change better and avoid pitfalls, by practicing a few key principles: anticipate and prepare for change, overcome fears, envision success, and enjoy change. Because change is part of life, we need to learn to deal with it. By depicting simple, memorable characters and scenarios, the parable gives you a framework for responding to change successfully.

How to Deal with Change in Life—8 Lessons (Who Moved My Cheese)

How to Deal with Change in Life—8 Lessons (Who Moved My Cheese)

No matter what environment we operate in — whether a town, city, family, relationship, workplace, or other setting — change is inevitable. “Who Moved My Cheese” by Spencer Johnson is a parable about a place that changed, and how its inhabitants reacted. Through the characters’ triumphs and travails, the story offers lessons and tips for how to deal with change in life by changing our attitudes and behavior. We’ll cover the story of “Who Moved My Cheese” and discuss how you can apply its lessons every day to learn how to deal with change in life.

Coping with Life Changes and Transitions (Who Moved My Cheese)

Coping with Life Changes and Transitions (Who Moved My Cheese)

“Who Moved My Cheese,” a bestseller by Spencer Johnson published in 1998, is a parable about the inevitability of change, the ways in which we typically deal with it, and how revising our attitude toward change can reduce stress and increase success. Like all parables, it’s told as a story that you can relate clearly to your life, and it can help you learn strategies for coping with life changes and transitions. We’ll cover the basic premise of the “Who Moved My Cheese” parable and discuss how its lessons might apply to your life. Learn the secrets to coping with

Postmodernism on Culture: Is Your Culture Destroying You?

Postmodernism on Culture: Is Your Culture Destroying You?

What is postmodernism’s view on culture? How does postmodernism on culture affect the way we view history? Postmodernism on culture says that humans exist to serve culture, and not the other way around. In a sense, according to the postmodernist view, cultures are plagues of society, not entities that serve us. We’ll cover postmodernism on culture and look at other ways scholars view our relationship with culture.

Does Everything Happen for a Reason? Not According to Experts

Does Everything Happen for a Reason? Not According to Experts

Does everything happen for a reason? Looking back at the past, can we tell why certain things happened and not others? Is history progressing to create a world that’s better for us? According to many scholars, history doesn’t benefit humans and things don’t necessarily happen for a reason. We’ll cover theories from historians and scholars in the humanities and social sciences to answer the question, “Does everything happen for a reason?”

Naive Empiricism: When Ignorance Makes You Smarter

Naive Empiricism: When Ignorance Makes You Smarter

What is naive empiricism? How does it work to counter confirmation bias? Naive empiricism is the scientific practice of approaching a problem without any assumptions or expectations, relying solely on empirical evidence. This term is occasionally used differently in other fields. We’ll cover how naive empiricism combats confirmation bias and other cognitive errors.

What Is a Dynamic System? Why Reality is Unpredictable

What Is a Dynamic System? Why Reality is Unpredictable

What is a dynamic system? What is dynamical systems theory? Why do dynamic systems make it so hard to make accurate predictions? A dynamical system (dynamic system) is one in which an array of inputs affect each other. Whereas prediction in a system that contains, say, two inputs, is a simple affair—one need only account for the qualities and behavior of those two inputs—prediction in a system that contains, say, five hundred billion inputs is effectively impossible. We’ll cover the most famous dynamic system examples and explore why dynamical systems make it so hard to make accurate predictions.