What Is the Difference Between Stocks and Bonds?

What Is the Difference Between Stocks and Bonds?

What is the difference between stocks and bonds? How do they generate profit for investors? The main difference between stocks and bonds is how they generate income for investors. Stocks do so by growing in value over time—they are later sold in the stock market. In contrast, bonds pay back your money plus interest over a specified period of time. In this article, we’ll explain the basics of investing in stocks versus bonds, how they work, and what their associated risks are.

Basic Knowledge of Stock the Market: 5 Truths to Know

Basic Knowledge of Stock the Market: 5 Truths to Know

What exactly is the stock market? What are some things you should know about before buying your first stock? The stock market is made up of all publicly traded companies that issue stock—when you buy stock in a company, you own a piece of that business. To invest successfully, you must have some basic knowledge of the stock market. In his book The Simple Path to Wealth, blogger and financial expert J. L. Collins lays out the following truths about the stock market that every beginner stock investor must accept and understand.

Tax-Advantaged Accounts: What You Need to Know

Tax-Advantaged Accounts: What You Need to Know

What are tax-advantaged accounts? What kind of financial assets should you use a tax-advantaged account for? Tax-advantaged accounts are tax-deferred or tax-exempt. You should use these accounts, such as IRAs and 401(k)s, for holding tax-inefficient assets (e.g. bond funds that generate taxable interest, actively managed stock funds, CDs, and REITs). They pay interest and non-qualified dividends and produce capital gains distributions. Below, we’ll take a look at the basic types of tax-advantaged accounts and their key characteristics.

Beta Risk: How Systemic Risk Yields High Returns

Beta Risk: How Systemic Risk Yields High Returns

What is a beta risk? What is the difference between systematic vs unsystematic risk? Does this particular kind of risk involve higher premiums? The key characteristic of systematic risk, better known as “beta risk” is that it cannot be diversified away by having a diverse portfolio. And researchers found that because it can’t be diversified away, beta risk is the only kind of risk that pays a “risk premium”—that is, a higher return for the higher risk. Keep reading for more about beta risk, and whether it actually leads to a higher premium.

The 4 Investing Mistakes Beginners Should Avoid

The 4 Investing Mistakes Beginners Should Avoid

Are you considering getting into investing? What are the most common investing mistakes beginner investors tend to make? In his book The Simple Path to Wealth, blogger and financial expert J. L. Collins warns new investors of four pitfalls they should know about before investing their hard-earned money. These include financial advisors, winning stocks, dollar-cost averaging, and common investment cons/scams. In this article, we’ll look at four pitfalls investors should beware of, starting with financial advisors.

Firm-Foundation Theory vs Castle-in-the-Air Theory

Firm-Foundation Theory vs Castle-in-the-Air Theory

What is firm-foundation theory? How is it different from castle-in-the-air theory? How do they differ and which is the best stock valuation method? There are two primary stock valuation methods. Firm-foundation theory states that assets have an “intrinsic value” based on the value of current dividends and estimated potential in the future. The idea here is that the stock will always regress to the intrinsic value. The castle-in-the-air theory has a different approach, stating that a stock is worth what people are prepared to pay for it. Keep reading for an in-depth look at firm-foundation theory and castle-in-the-air theory.

Fundamental Analysis and Investing: Does It Work?

Fundamental Analysis and Investing: Does It Work?

What does a fundamental analysis of investing options involve? Does this method of stock valuation work?  Fundamental analysis is a method of stock valuation that uses in in-depth study to determine a stock’s value.  Fundamental analysis of investing options takes into account a number of factors in addition to past price movement, including revenues, growth rate, and management skills.  Find out more about fundamental analysis and investing below.